The Isolation of Samuel Morse

The Isolation of Samuel Morse is an illustration collection that was shown at Album Gallery in Toronto, and ran from July 1st through August of 2014. Pieces from the show can be purchased here. From the didactic:

“Loneliness is a part of a schism between an individual and their circumstance. The abject awareness of an individual’s own isolation against a rejection of the same individual.

Samuel Morse, a painter from Massachusetts, born in 1791 embodies this more than any other figure. In 1825, while commissioned to paint in Washington DC, Morse received a letter by horse messenger stating that his wife had fallen ill. When he returned to Massachusetts to care for his ailing wife, he discovered that she had died before the message had ever gotten to him. The devastation of this reveal urged him to dedicate the next 45 years of his life to the creation of rapid long distance communication. He believed that no one else should feel that kind of isolation.

The loneliness of Samuel Morse is haunting and precise. Stemming from the pain of knowing that he was alone in the delusion that his wife was alive, while her family and friends buried her. The pain of knowing that his entire view of the world was completely alienated from reality.”